Rossall Beach

Located just 4 miles north of Blackpool the beach front here is a vast expanse of sea and sand, with Groynes stretching for several kilometres up and down the coastline on either side of the bathing water.

Location

Rossall Beach Promenade,
Cleveleys,
Thornton-Cleveleys
FY5 1JD

OS Map Reference

SD 3124 4297
A static map of Rossall Beach

Know before you go

Parking information

Pay and display parking against the sea wall

Walking trails

Along the sea front an artwork trail follows the story of the Sea Swallow. Look for the Shipwreck Memorial, the Sea Swallow, the Ogres Paddle, the Ogre himself and Mary’s Shell. The Ogre is a huge stone sculpture on the beach, but you can only see him when the tide is out.

Follow the interpretation boards along the boardwalk to learn about the different species found in the area. Don't forget to walk up to the look out at the top of Rossall Tower.

Access

The beach is slightly sloping with some undulations caused by the tide. There is a board walk in the dunes.

Dogs

No dogs permitted
Dogs are not allowed on the beach adjacent to the stepped promenade (from Cafe Cove to the Shipwreck Memorial) between 1 May and 30 September. You can take dogs on Anchorsholme Beach, which is adjacent to the new promenade at Princes Way.

Facilities

Toilets
Shop
Cafe/refreshments

When to visit

Opening times

Open all year round

Best time to visit

All year round

About the reserve

What makes Rossall so special?

Sometimes, at low tide you will find the remains of a petrified forest on the beach. It dates back to prehistoric times when sea levels were much lower and the country was covered in trees. The sea is said to have gained 3 yards of land every year dating back as far as 1788 which means a lot of ‘land’ is now submerged. 

There’s also said to be a sunken village off the coast. The flooding is thought to have occurred in the mid-1500s, when the inhabitants of Singleton Thorpe had to flee their homes. It was one of 12 villages destroyed between Carlisle and Southport.

What to do

The beach is backed by a promenade and the Jubilee Gardens all of which have benefitted from a recent large scale renovation project. Whilst traditional activities such as building sand castles, flying kites and promenading are as popular as ever there are now art installations and a new focus on the coast's abundant wildlife.

Along the sea front an artwork trail follows the story of the Sea Swallow, a specially commissioned story book which combines local folklore, myth and the legends around Wyre’s coastline. Look for the Shipwreck Memorial, the Sea Swallow, the Ogres Paddle, the Ogre himself and Mary’s Shell. The Ogre is a huge stone sculpture on the beach, but you can only see him when the tide is out.

Across the road are the Jubilee Gardens with a children’s play area, a multi-use games area and skate park.

Why not go for a walk or cycle along the sea front, or stroll along the promenade and watch one of the stunning sunsets?